Studio 2D | Creativity
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Creativity

Parallelism

When you have more than one thing grouped together, keep them parallel. A simple example: in a list of actions, use the same verb tense for each. In a more complicated work such as a movie or novel, parallelism helps the audience know how diverse characters and timelines relate to each other. In the visual arts, parallel elements have the same weight or color. Parallelism is a unifying concept that tells the audience what elements are congruent.

Metaphors

Using one thing to represent something else is metaphor. Sometimes a metaphor helps your audience understand a concept better, or see it in a new way. Once you have found a metaphor for your message, take the opportunity to explore it fully. Go beyond clichés for real creativity. Don’t mix metaphors!

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Mythology and Folklore

A rich source of symbolism and imagery is found in mythology and folklore. To find out why these stories resonate so strongly across cultures and ages, read Joseph Campbell’s The Power of Myth and The Hero with a Thousand Faces. Studying mythology can put you in touch with a dreamlike world at the deepest level of human consciousness. Many great works of art were inspired by myth.

Tell a Story

A story has an arc—a beginning, a middle, and an end. A good story builds tension and anticipation, and has a climax followed by a resolution. An engaging story has a wealth of interesting detail, but themes that are universal. You can tell a story in a 30-second TV commercial, a building, or a symphony. Whatever you are creating, think about how your audience will experience it as it unfolds.

Limitation and Parameters

What is more intimidating than a blank page? The best spark for creativity is a limitation. Do not strain against parameters, use them to transcend the obvious. Deadlines and budgets are motivators. Materials and locations offer you their strengths (and weaknesses). How many of the things you love were created with unlimited time and money? Having no restraints can be paralyzing, or lead to worthless excess. Embrace your limitations and parameters.

Creativity by Quantity

One way to accomplish a creative breakthrough is by sheer quantity of solutions. Set a goal of coming up with 100 ways to solve the problem. You will quickly go though all the obvious answers and clichés, and soon enter the realm of the ridiculous. In order to reach 100, you will be forced to think creatively. Because few people will push themselves as far, you will very likely have some ideas that no one has thought of before. Furthermore, all the unique experiences and thoughts that only you can bring to the exercise will make your list of 100 uniquely different from anyone else’s.READ MORE

The Sketchbook

Inspiration can be fleeting. Your sketchbook is the net to capture elusive ideas as they flutter by.
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Eureka

Sometimes an idea enters your mind fully formed and without effort. Sometimes you will be able to conceive the end result during the research or generation stage of the process. Sometimes all the incubation in the world doesn’t lead to a great idea. Sometimes the pieces all fit together only when you begin the execution. The value of following a 5 step process is that it will lead to a satisfactory result even when the eureka moment never happens. When it does, you are experiencing a true gift.

Creative Environment

For me, the most important condition for a creative breakthrough is the right environment. I like a space that is free of clutter. Reminders of chores and other distractions must be out of sight. The ringer on the phone is off. The creative process itself can become messy and disorganized, but I like to start with order.

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Copy the Masters

If you want to paint like Van Gogh, copy one of his paintings brushstroke for brushstroke. If you want to improvise like Charlie Parker, transcribe one of his solos note for note. Copying seems like the opposite of creativity, but this exercise will give you insight into the mind of a genius that you can use in your own work. Imitation is not unethical unless you try to pass your work off as someone else’s, that is, you commit plagiarism or forgery. Most likely, your own self will shine through whatever you do.READ MORE